Public lecture at IIHS

Public lecture at IIHS

The director at IPH, Dr. Upendra Bhojani, gave a public lecture at IIHS in the ‘Publics’ lecture series.  The talk was on Dr. Bhojani’s long standing work on the role of local health systems in poor urban neighbourhoods in Bangalore. The talk emphasised that there is an urgent need to strengthen local health systems to provide affordable and quality care to a large number of people, particularly to the urban poor, living with chronic conditions. It unpacked the complex dynamics of local health system. Dr. Bhojani also highlighted the need to go beyond just improving the health systems – to further address other social determinants of chronic conditions such as poverty, age- and gender-based social norms, family structure, and inadequate social care provision.

A video recording of the talk can be watched here.

ITM visit

The director at IPH, Dr. Upendra Bhojani, attended the Be-cause health international conference on Urban health, organized by the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. It was held on 15-16 October 2019 in Brussels. The conference sought to “address the following questions: How to achieve universal access to health in cities? What is the best way to organize health services and the health system in urban settings? How does addressing the impact of urban life impact on the health of urban populations?” 

With respect to institutional building, Dr. Bhojani had a meeting with the new director of ITM, Marc-Alain Widdowson. The new director was briefed about the overview of IPH, the role of IPH-ITM partnership in the past, and how do we see the partnership with ITM in future. Dr. Bhojani also along with Diljith Kannan had a joint partners meeting wherein they discussed on  working together through innovations in partnerships and joint-education activities. 


PGIMER 2019

PGIMER 2019

The Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, PGIMER, organized the  2nd Public Health Policy and Management Program from 30th September to the 4th of October, 2019. The program was sponsored by the Ministry of External Affairs, Govt. of India under ITEC scheme. The motivation of the program was “to enhance the understanding of senior level policy makers about best practices in Public Health Policy and Management of India for addressing contextual public health challenges for overall attainment of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).” 

The director at IPH, Dr. Upendra Bhojani, delivered two lectures. The first one was on agenda setting and policy implementation of public health policies. The second lecture dealt with the politics of health policy. There were participants from more than a dozen countries. This was a flagship program of its kind on public health policies. Further collaboration between PGIMER and IPH was also discussed.


Photo Caption: PGIMER

 

Realist evaluation in health policy

Realist evaluation in health policy

Date

09-11 Oct 2019

Fees

INR 21,000

Facilitators:

Prashanth NS

Prashanth NS

Faculty and Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance Intermediate Fellow, Institute of Public Health, Bengaluru

Pragati Hebbar

Pragati Hebbar

Faculty and Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance Early Career Fellow, Institute of Public Health, Bengaluru

Are you thinking of using realist evaluation (RE) in your work? You have heard of realist evaluation but are unsure if it will work for you in your research or evaluation project? Or are you generally curious about health policy and programme evaluation and would like to learn about realist evaluation?

Then this 3 day workshop on realist evaluation is the most appropriate starting point for you to understand this approach. Through this hands-on workshop the concepts of theory-driven inquiry and particularly realist evaluation will be explained. The workshop will help participants understand and design a study based on realist evaluation using practical examples. Realist evaluation is an essential evaluation method that is idea to study programmes and policies in health. The starting point of a realist evaluation is the fact that programmes and policies work for some and not for others and hence the technique allows to explain how and why programmes and policies work, especially in complex health system settings.
If you are working or considering to work in these areas of health policy and systems research and would like to equip yourself with this approach join us from 9 – 11 October in Bengaluru for an immersive learning experience.
Tobacco Control |JIPMER 2019

Tobacco Control |JIPMER 2019

The 5th National Workshop on Tobacco Control, held in JIPMER from 26th August to 30th August 2019, was attended by IPH researchers, Riddhi Dsouza,  Vivek Dsouza, and Adhip Amin. Three major themes were addressed in the Workshop. First, the history and politics of WHO’s Framework Convention of Tobacco Control (FCTC) where India is a signatory. The architecture, implementation, and consequences on tobacco consumption, of the Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Act, 2003 (COTPA) — and the relationship between the FCTC and COTPA. Second, the basic principles of epidemiology in relation to tobacco use was covered. Furthermore on quantitative analysis, the second round of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), in the context of India, was discussed. Third, the behavioral and psychological component of tobacco addiction — and strategies for tobacco cessation — was also reviewed. 


The director at IPH, Dr. Upendra Bhojani, delivered a lecture on the endgame strategies for tobacco control; what are the levers, mechanisms, and ideas, that can enable policy and law to generate a tobacco free generation. The point was also made that values are important in tobacco policy — how one approaches tobacco control will differ regarding a person’s moral and political philosophy — which we must acknowledge and respect.

Participants of the workshop

SARC-CCT in Sri Lanka

SARC-CCT in Sri Lanka

Panelists Dr. Mary Assunta & Dr. Upendra Bhojani.
Image credit: SARC-CCT

The University of Colombo works systematically on tobacco control and was established as a tobacco observatory Sri Lanka in 2016. Recently, this observatory was expanded to the South Asia region to create the South Asian Regional Consortium Centre for Combating Tobacco (SARC-CCT). 

The centre organized an inaugural workshop, inviting researchers and advocates for the launch of the SARC-CCT on 15-18th July 2019, in Colombo. On invitation, the Institute of Public Health, Bengaluru (IPH) was represented & actively participated in the workshop.

Dr. Upendra Bhojani, representing IPH, also had the opportunity to serve as a panelist. Along with his panel members, Dr. Pranay Lal, Senior Technical Advisor, The Union, Delhi and Dr. Mary Assunta, Head of Global Research and Advocacy, Global Center for Good Governance in Tobacco Control, Thailand, Upendra contributed to a blog post that summarize common tobacco control challenges. The blog post is linked here.

The South Asian region has some shared history and common challenges of tobacco control and also offers some unique positive examples (Bhutan, Sri Lanka and India among others) to the world. This event was a key gathering of experts, which highlighted the unique insights that SAARC nations can offer in terms of tobacco control and the importance of close collaboration with other countries in the region.