Realist evaluation in health policy

Realist evaluation in health policy

Date

09-11 Oct 2019

Fees

INR 21,000

Facilitators:

Prashanth NS

Prashanth NS

Faculty and Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance Intermediate Fellow, Institute of Public Health, Bengaluru

Pragati Hebbar

Pragati Hebbar

Faculty and Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance Early Career Fellow, Institute of Public Health, Bengaluru

Are you thinking of using realist evaluation (RE) in your work? You have heard of realist evaluation but are unsure if it will work for you in your research or evaluation project? Or are you generally curious about health policy and programme evaluation and would like to learn about realist evaluation?

Then this 3 day workshop on realist evaluation is the most appropriate starting point for you to understand this approach. Through this hands-on workshop the concepts of theory-driven inquiry and particularly realist evaluation will be explained. The workshop will help participants understand and design a study based on realist evaluation using practical examples. Realist evaluation is an essential evaluation method that is idea to study programmes and policies in health. The starting point of a realist evaluation is the fact that programmes and policies work for some and not for others and hence the technique allows to explain how and why programmes and policies work, especially in complex health system settings.
If you are working or considering to work in these areas of health policy and systems research and would like to equip yourself with this approach join us from 9 – 11 October in Bengaluru for an immersive learning experience.
Tobacco Control |JIPMER 2019

Tobacco Control |JIPMER 2019

The 5th National Workshop on Tobacco Control, held in JIPMER from 26th August to 30th August 2019, was attended by IPH researchers, Riddhi Dsouza,  Vivek Dsouza, and Adhip Amin. Three major themes were addressed in the Workshop. First, the history and politics of WHO’s Framework Convention of Tobacco Control (FCTC) where India is a signatory. The architecture, implementation, and consequences on tobacco consumption, of the Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Act, 2003 (COTPA) — and the relationship between the FCTC and COTPA. Second, the basic principles of epidemiology in relation to tobacco use was covered. Furthermore on quantitative analysis, the second round of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), in the context of India, was discussed. Third, the behavioral and psychological component of tobacco addiction — and strategies for tobacco cessation — was also reviewed. 


The director at IPH, Dr. Upendra Bhojani, delivered a lecture on the endgame strategies for tobacco control; what are the levers, mechanisms, and ideas, that can enable policy and law to generate a tobacco free generation. The point was also made that values are important in tobacco policy — how one approaches tobacco control will differ regarding a person’s moral and political philosophy — which we must acknowledge and respect.

Participants of the workshop

SARC-CCT in Sri Lanka

SARC-CCT in Sri Lanka

Panelists Dr. Mary Assunta & Dr. Upendra Bhojani.
Image credit: SARC-CCT

The University of Colombo works systematically on tobacco control and was established as a tobacco observatory Sri Lanka in 2016. Recently, this observatory was expanded to the South Asia region to create the South Asian Regional Consortium Centre for Combating Tobacco (SARC-CCT). 

The centre organized an inaugural workshop, inviting researchers and advocates for the launch of the SARC-CCT on 15-18th July 2019, in Colombo. On invitation, the Institute of Public Health, Bengaluru (IPH) was represented & actively participated in the workshop.

Dr. Upendra Bhojani, representing IPH, also had the opportunity to serve as a panelist. Along with his panel members, Dr. Pranay Lal, Senior Technical Advisor, The Union, Delhi and Dr. Mary Assunta, Head of Global Research and Advocacy, Global Center for Good Governance in Tobacco Control, Thailand, Upendra contributed to a blog post that summarize common tobacco control challenges. The blog post is linked here.

The South Asian region has some shared history and common challenges of tobacco control and also offers some unique positive examples (Bhutan, Sri Lanka and India among others) to the world. This event was a key gathering of experts, which highlighted the unique insights that SAARC nations can offer in terms of tobacco control and the importance of close collaboration with other countries in the region.

Policy Roundtable: Urban Health Governance in India

Policy Roundtable: Urban Health Governance in India

Image credit: Observer Research Foundation

Dr. Upendra Bhojani, India Alliance Fellow and Director at IPH, was invited to participate in a Roundtable discussion hosted by Observer Research Foundation (ORF) and World Health Organization, India in Delhi on the 26th July 2019. The roundtable discussion was attended by subject experts, bureaucrats and researchers from Mumbai, Chennai, Hyderabad, Bengaluru and Delhi.

While urbanization offers opportunities for growth and development, it poses unique challenges for health and health governance. Acknowledging health as a key component of urban planning and governance by policymakers is an important step to visualize and translate sustainable urban development into action. Themes that were broadly discussed over the course of the day include:

  • The need to strengthen and rationalise existing urban primary health structures in the context of Ayushman Bharat.
  • The need for strong financial governance to help minimise underutilisation of funds.
  • Lack of effective Monitoring, Surveillance and Accountability systems among diverse stakeholders.

The full report of the event is accessible here.

Video on “Tobacco-Free Generation”

Video on “Tobacco-Free Generation”

“Tobacco-free generation” is a proposal wherein children born after a certain year grow up in tobacco free environments, with legislation in place restricting exposure, sale and use of tobacco for that generation. This is potentially a very powerful intervention, that is progressive and strategic in achieving tobacco control. It has been proposed and implemented to various extents in a few countries, including Tasmania and Netherlands. As a strategy it is feasible as it is aimed at overcoming defects with current youth access laws.

Dr. Upendra Bhojani, India Alliance Fellow and Director at IPH, published a video as a part of a 2-day National Consultation by Generation Saviour Association (GSA), The Union and Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh on date that explains his views on this topic. He explains the issue and argues for its social, economic and national importance, while shedding light on the ethical issues that can arise in the context of such interventions.

The video has been uploaded to YouTube and is available for viewing here:

routine dental practice

routine dental practice

The MPOWER package is a package introduced by WHO, comprising of six measures to assist in country-level implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. One of the six components of the MPOWER package is “Offer help to quit tobacco use.”

Often, tobacco users are aware of the risks, but require support to overcome addiction or dependence on the substance. It is recommended that support for tobacco cessation should also lie with health-systems, where programs for tobacco cessation should be incorporated and embedded into primary health care services, with health care providers acting as advocates for tobacco control.

Dr. Upendra Bhojani serves as a guide for Rachana Shah (Government Dental College and Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India) on her work on how to integrate tobacco cessation support with the help of health professionals as a part of routine primary care. This project shifts the focus from tobacco cessation centres to healthcare providers as playing an important role in delivering such services.

Previous work by this research team showed that Dentists are generally willing, though very few display this in clinical practice, in an article titled Dentists and tobacco cessation: Moving beyond willingness.

Rachana Shah’s doctoral proposal examines the role of oral health professionals (OHP) and the experiences and expectations of dental patients in the context of tobacco cessation (TC) services. The protocol of her doctoral study titled “Integrating tobacco cessation into routine dental practice: protocol for a qualitative study” was recently published in BMJ Open, linked here.