Towards health equity: understanding and improving health of forest-dwelling tribal communities in southern India

Towards health equity: understanding and improving health of forest-dwelling tribal communities in southern India

Speaker

Date and time

14 July 2017, 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

 

Venue

#250, 2nd C Main, 2nd C Cross,

Girinagar Ist  Phase,

Bengaluru – 560085

 

The seminar will focus on the objectives and study design for the research project that Prashanth is undertaking under the Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance Intermediate Fellowship in Clinical and Public Health. It will begin with an overview of tribal health research in India. India’s tribal population lives largely in and around thickly forested areas, which are often difficult-to-reach. Most areas with high tribal populations also have poor health and nutrition indicators. However, the poor population health outcomes in tribal communities cannot be explained by geography alone. Social determinants of health, especially various social disadvantages compound the problem of access and utilization of health services and achieving good health and nutritional status. In the interest of achieving equitable health and universal health coverage, we need to better understand the reasons for poor health among tribal populations and generate scientific explanations for the drivers of health inequalities in tribal communities. This will help design and implement evidence-based and context-specific interventions to address health inequalities of tribal populations. In this research project, we will
1. describe and analyse the extent and patterns of health inequalities among forest-dwelling tribal communities in three major tribal regions;
2. explain the underlying reasons for health inequity among tribal communities through a contextualized and empirically validated theory;
3. design and pilot an intervention to address health inequalities by tribal communities.

Joining the dots: Health and Environment

Joining the dots: Health and Environment

Date

6-July-2015

Time

2.30-4.30 pm

Venue

Institute of Public health
#250, 2nd C Main, 2nd C Cross,
Girinagar Ist  Phase,
Bengaluru – 560085

About:

Health and environment are very closely linked. However, health and environmental problems are often separately framed and studied by researchers, practitioners and policymakers. Debates in both these topics often marginally mention about the intricacies of the other and public discourses often do not borrow enough from the decades of research and practice in these disciplines.

In order to explore broadly the various kinds of linkages between the two, IPH hosted a public health seminar called “Joining the dots: Health and Environment”. The event began with a video-talk by environment and wildlife filmmaker Mr. Kalyan Varma who shared the story of the grasslands, wolves and the nomadic Dhangar community of Maharashtra. His talk set the scene for the comments and discussions that followed from panelists. Dr. TR Shankar Raman from Nature Conservation Foundation discussed several instances of intersections between health and environment including human-wildlife conflicts and use of harmful agrochemicals. Ms. Aruna Chandrasekhar focussed on affected communities along mining projects and the fallout of corporate activities for human and environmental health. Dr. Aditya Pradyumna of SOCHARA shared his own journey as a researcher intersecting human and environmental health and discussed the ethics and value-systems that can form barriers. Dr. Neethi V Rao of IPH summed up the narratives of the other panellists and emphasized the immediacy and relevance of these intersections even among the primarily urban, educated audience of the seminar. These preliminary comments were followed by open discussion on the various common conversations between health and environment. Dr. Prashanth NS of IPH moderated the proceedings.

Health Impact Assessment

Health Impact Assessment

_MG_1433-Recovered(Image Courtesy : Bhargav Shandilya)

Date

5-May-2015

Time

3.00-5.00 pm

Venue

Institute of Public health

#250, 2nd C Main, 2nd C Cross,

Girinagar Ist  Phase,

Bengaluru – 560085

An estimated 60% of all deaths in 2014 in India were due to non- communicable diseases (NCD). NCDs are estimated to cost INR 126 trillion to Indian economy from now through 2030- almost 35 times the country’s annual health expenditure.The Government of India has responded to the threat of NCDs with the National Program for prevention and control of Diabetes, Cardiovascular diseases and Stroke (NPCDCS) and a national monitoring framework for prevention and control of NCDs. The World Health Organization (WHO) in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (Government of India) is facilitating development of a National Multisectoral Action Plan for prevention and control of NCDs in India. The National Multisectoral Action Plan (2014-2020) is meant to provide clear direction and a holistic approach by catalyzing partnerships with non-health stakeholders to integrate NCD prevention strategies.

In this context, the Institute of Public Health (IPH) recently assisted WHO, India in carrying out a rapid health impact assessment of policies of select government sectors for their potential impacts on prevention and control of NCDs. The health impact assessment is one of the tools to actualize health-in-all-policies approach and understand/address social determinants of health – that are often out of traditionally conceived ‘health sector’.

The next public health seminar is aimed at sharing findings of the rapid health impact assessment of policies of the four central government ministries (ministry of rural development; ministry of commerce and industry; ministry of food processing industry; ministry of environment, forests and climate change) with regard to NCDs. The intention is to share the findings but also take the discourse forward on broader whole-of-government multisectoral approach to heath in general and for prevention and control of NCDs in particular.