As a matter of health and social justice, health research should improve the health and well-being of those considered disadvantaged and marginalised and foster their engagement in all phases of its conduct. Such communities’ engagement in priority-setting is a key means for setting research topics and questions of relevance and benefit to them. However, without attention to dynamics of power and diversity, their engagement can lead to presence without voice and voice without influence. What is needed to give marginalised communities a voice in agenda-setting for health research projects? In this talk, Bridget will present the findings of conceptual and empirical research that address this question. Key ethical considerations for sharing power with community members that should be taken into account before, during and after priority-setting will be identified and discussed.

Speaker

Bridget Pratt

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Affiliation

Ethics researcher, University of Melbourne

Date

04-December-2018

Time

11:00 am – 12.00 pm

Admissions open for 2020!

In this Certificate course in Research Methods (eRM) course, we start with helping the student develop clear and well formulated research questions. Participants are then taught how to select research designs and methods best suited to answer the research question, beyond the usual epidemiological disciplines.

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